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>>> booktv recently sought with michael skerker of the u.s. naval academy to talk about his book an ethics of interrogation. this interview is part of book tv's college series. it's about 20 minutes. >> you are watching book tv on c-span2. one of the things we do in booktv is visit campuses around the country. it gives us a chance to talk with professors who are also authors and today we are at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland and joining us is the author of this book, michael skerker an ethics of interrogation is the name of the book. published by the university of chicago press. professor skerker, what do you do with theb academy? >> i teach the ethics class all the youngsters have to take and a number to loss of one studies to request to reduce the ethics of interrogation in your book is the philosophical books worth how to interrogate?y >> guest: >> it is the principal question number one circumstances can the state asked.yyyyyyy then there are some practical dos and don'ts as well. >> what is the geneva convention that we always talk about? spec the gene
in the fighter wing. i was there will not place blew up. i don't think any of us were thinking of terrorism than the way it is now. we were not prepared to fight to we were brought up to fight to the soviet union. i asked my teenage daughter what is going on with russia? it is a soviet union. what is that? it was of big things back then before toppled most of us had never considered iraq of saddam hussein but winning was a foregone conclusion and terrorism took us by subplot -- surprise. we thought they were rabble rouser is. the bin laden construction company how is that for irony? >> but after that things change with the world trade center bombing and september september 11th i was flying that morning. coming in from another rotation and september 10th was our first day back. essentially flying and i had come down nearly and somebody said you have to look at this. i thought what moron of the pilot could hit the tower of that size on a clear day? i thought it was an accident. then the second plane hit they sent us up to close down the airspace of the united states. that is eerie as the pilot. "
years and has already, i know, improved training techniques. >> michael skerker is a professor at the u.s. naval academy, and he is the author of this book, "an ethics of interrogation." here it is. this is book tv at the u.s. naval academy. >> is there a nonfiction of your book you would like to see featured on book tv? send us an e-mail. or tweet us. talks about the history of the office of strategic services in china and the successes and failures the organization had. this interview, recorded at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, md., was a part of the book tv college series and is about 20 minutes. >> on your screen, a professor at the u.s. naval academy, also the author of this book, al ss in china, a prelude to a cold war. professor, if you would, start by briefly describing china's role in world war ii. >> china's role in world war ii is very complex. first of all, china entered the war first. most people in china would agree that china entered the world were to way back in 1937, july july 1937 with china and japan went to full-scale war. that fact, of course gile was not recogn
>>> was interviewed about his book that the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland. this interviews part of book tv college series and it's a little under 15 minutes. >> book tv is on location that the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland where we are interviewing some professors who are also authors. .. >> "in buddha's company" thai soldiers in the vietnam war" what warded did thailand play? >> they were a very close ally during the vietnam war. people familiar would know that not only did thailand send troops to fight along the united states, but also served as a base for many aircraft for bombing missions over ho chi minh trail, over laos and at the time we had built seven their bases and developed a port as well to facilitate the u.s. effort and also many soldiers went to bangkok and in terms of support thailand was the close ally. >>host: did they have soldiers? >> absolutely. they spent 37 -- cent to 37,000 soldiers to fight in vietnam also they sent smaller naval units but defin
were in, we felt safe and comfortable there. and i feel like my father, he wanted us to have an education. he knew that education was the key to a better life, but i really think he got -- he thought all of us would come right back home and try to work from there. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. .. this interview as part of book tv college series, about 20 minutes. >> and your watching book tv on c-span2. one of the things we do is visit campuses around the country. it gives us a chance to talk with professors who are also authors, and today we are at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis to maryland. joining us is the author of this book, michael skerker, an ethics of interrogation is the name of the book published by the university of chicago press. professor, first of all, what do you do at the naval academy? >> i am an ethicist. to see at this glass that all the answers have to take in some upper levels las, religiousyy studies and that they courses. >> would you say your book is a philosophical book or a how to interrogate book? >> it is
be very important because of pre-war because china as well as the united states u.s. to lift the asia first and second strategy which has become a major issue. while most of the british try t down play that role and i think in retrospect, both sides had this validity and the argument, and by the time china had becom very important toward the end o 1943, 1944 the nature of the  had changed because the u.s. original strategy was to drive the japanese to the western pacific to the edge to go north and through the japan homeland. but by the end of 1943 to 44 particularly after the battle o the philippines. so the land route which was urgently planned by china have become much less significant. so that's why it is very mplex. >> professor why did you plan the attack in china in 1937? >> that is a long story. to make it short, both japan an china were military and economically in the 1930's and japan has a very different national psyche than the chinese. there are big, divide
father want the us to have an education. we knew that education was to a better life. i think he taught all of us would come back home and try to work from there. >>> you with catch this and overprograms online at booktv.org. >>> in an interview conducted on the campus of george mason university during the fall for the book festival. in the book she shares her experience with growing up in mexico without her parents. who immigrate to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> what is -- [inaudible] >> the way u grew up knowing it was it was the reference to the united states, but to me because i grew up in the hometown surrounded by mountains, i didn't know where the united states was to me it was the other side of the mountain. during the time my parents were gone, working here in the u.s. i will look at the mountain something i parents were over there on the other side of the mountains. that was what it meant to me. >> where did you grow up? originally where were u born. >> in mexico. southern mexico in the little city that nobody has heard of. why mentio
she and the professional educators year aircraft for the u.s. navy in 10 years ago made the transition to academia where the provided the outstanding opportunity for graduate school to have a specialty in a geographic part of the world where i specialize in middle eastern history. >>host: allen author "the politics and security of the >>guest: it is. the part of the world with united states has been involved in the iran-iraq war, desert shield, desert storm and operation in iraqi freedom. it is a big topic and it needs to be discussed and investigated. >>host: where do you begin talking about u.s. involvement? >>guest: the u.s. involvement in the valleys goes much further back. we specifically look at the persian and gulf even though they sent some ships it is really world for to the united states and military get involved in a big way. surprisingly it does not have to do with the oil. world war ii marked the entry of the united states and its military to provide a secure pathway for supplies to the beleaguered soviet russian allies in their quest to defeat the germans.
at the manhattan institute. thank you for joining us. the question of whether and how government, particularly the federal government directs tax dollars to specific industries was a discussion in last night's presidential debate and has become an important and ongoing theme in the current presidential campaign. the terms by which washington assisted the finance and auto industries have been the focus of intense debate but the most contentious example of all is the one on which diana furchtgott-roth, senior fellow and speaker this afternoon focuses in her timely and important new book "regulating to disaster: how green jobs policies are damaging america's economy". in it, she subjects assumptions and policies which led to such ill-fated federal investments as that of the now bankrupt solyndra solar panel manufacturer as well as the a 123 caller battery manufacturer to a withering analysis which we at the institute have come to expect of the oxford trained economist whose chief of staff for the council of economic advisers. sorry. during the administration of president george w. bush. in her bo
. >> richard ruth was interviewed about his book "in buddha's company" at the u.s. naval academy. this is part of book tv's college series and it's a little under 15 minutes. >> host: book tvs on location at the u.s. naval academy in a aanapolis. professor ruth, what do you teach? >> guest: i teach southeast asian history. i concentrate on tie lan and vietnam. >> host: why is it important for students to know southeast asian history. >> guest: united states is still very much engaged in that corner of the worldment we have many alis and partners we're working with, and many students, midshipman, are going to be officers who are going to go to southeast asia and represent our interests there. so i think it's important for them to know southeast asian history to be comfortable with the culture and have some knowledge of their history. >> host: well, professor ruth. one of our long-time allies is thigh taken, and you have written a book called "in buddha's company: thai sole soldiers in the vietnam war." what role did they play? >> guest: thailand was a close ally of the united states during the
, streets and the neighbors. tell us about that. >> well, you know, we were in baker county, you hear about, you read about some of the sheriffs of earlier years, but the gator and the sheriff in our county wanted to be known as the gator. the gator actually ruled everything, everyone in the county. you can imagine looking at the westerns from earlier days, anyone like him, but he was worse than what you see in your worst western. but growing up in that, my family lived, my great, great grandparents had come to baker county, i don't know whether they came as slaves or not, but i know they ended up there as sharecroppers, and with the intent on buying land. and that they did. they bought enough land that the area where i grew up is still today called hopkins down. and lots of families, but it was that way commute, the hawkins lived in one area. the williams and another, but we were all one big family, and felt we had to help each other. and so i was raised up on a farm, and my father, there were five girls, you know, any farmer wants a son. i guess any man wants a son, but my mother and fath
volunteer work in the u.s. and around the world. this was recorded in fairfax virginia and is about 20 minutes. >> host: "the voluntourist" is a book by ken budd. what is it about? >> guest: this is a way to do it if you can take two years to join the peace corps. postmark when did you start voluntary? >> guest: i started after hurricane katrina. host mark what caused you to do this? >> guest: it was one of those times in my life when i didn't know what i was doing, and that this opportunity came up and i thought was perfect because i had no skills whatsoever. i did whatever they ask for in skilled people come in, they clean up than they do the serious work. so we did very basic labor. but it was necessary later. >> host: did you feel that your two weeks in new orleans was worthy? >> guest: guesstimate everywhere that i went from a question that. i said, what can you really do in two weeks? beyond the fact that yes, it is helpful to paint a house, but there was an intangible quality that it was good to be in new orleans nine months after hurricane katrina. people were so happy to have
. one more. yes, please. >> what this likelihood that the regime will use chemical weapons and what should we or could we do if they do? >> good question. that's one of the questions that no one has an answer, understand what circumstances would the regime use chemical weapons. i suspect they don't want to use them because that would galvanize the exact international response they're trying to avoid. the don't want this type of mass blood-letting that will compel the international community to intervene much more assertively than it has. so i don't think they're going to use chemical weapons. the fear is, though, if the regime -- if the opposition gains the upper hand, if the regime is on its last legs will they want to go down in flames or will they want to launch a chemical attack against israel, for instance, desperately trying to turn a domestic conflict into an arab israeli war that will take the pressure off them for a little bit, coe aless the people around israel and soing for. that's the dooms day scenario. >> wonderful, thank you so much for being here. [applause] >> i wou
not understand the military? so the budget hearings required us of course, we don't talk about all of the sudan's but i like teaching the course. >> the idea to give a government check there is extra responsibilities. >> and also one more project, a book giveaway? >> one time one-shot that we have a load of fox we collected a bunch of books have never been paid per truckload to go to a landfill. so let's do another and another. we just passed five 5/6 billionth book. looked at the football field. side to side with and that is about to tractor to there and it is a library and a box. then we send items so some of the review books we dead and we believe we have the largest volunteer base contribution in the world that we can ship in expensive way. we have 4,048 contained but other organizations start at 16,000 because they use individuals. we bring them in and sort them out. >> and but to other countries? >> we have done 40 countries. most african but you pakistan, tajikistan and south american countd sort them out. >> and but to other countries? >> we have done 40 countries. most african but you
explores why some firms fail. this week david k. johnston diss his book "the fine print" how they use plain i english to rob you blind. visit booktv.org for more information in an interview taped outside of washington, d.c., wayne karlin talking about his book wandering souls which is an account of the u.s. soldier return to vietnam to return a notbook he took from a soldier he killed during the north vietnam war. >>> joining us now on booktv is author and professor wayne karlin who most recent book is "wandering soul." professor karlin who was homer? >> he is a friend of mine who retired living in north carolina. he was a officer platoon leader in the vietnam war. and he had contacted me a number of years ago because i had some contacts in vietnam vietnamese i had been working with, he had taken a documents and a book from the body of an vietnamese soldier he killed during the war. and wanted to see if he could find a family and return those documents to this them. >> why. he had gone through decades of ptsd, not only because he killed that man, he had a rough war, he killed many people he
during the administration of president george w. bush. she helps us understand while the failures of private firms have significant problems themselves and cautionary tales to have the government rather than private investors allocate capital. the publication of regulating to disaster caps her first year as a senior fellow in which she has been prolific and influential cited by a writers, reporters and talk show host across the country. to think of her many contributions ranging from her analysis demonstrating even adjusting for the state of the economy those receiving food stamps it is that an all-time high. to another that we'll companies are not monopoly's controlled by a few but an important source of wealth and income for millions of average americans. whether clear markets coming tax notes or testified before congress she it is a powerful and detective voice. as you will agree after her talk. diana furchtgott-roth holds degrees from oxford university and were spurred college. she also served on the staff of the domestic policy council under george hw bush and his staff econo
in the white house having different towns about posture. using the changes if he gets a second term? goes back to the tone he had before? >> i wrote about his policies around poverty and he stopped talking about poverty the last couple years. i would like to think he would go back to poverty in 2007. .. >> the low-income population grew 71%. the english language learning population grew 169%. these are the issues we have to address in this state. thank you all for joining us up. [laughter] >> this event took place at the 17th annual texas book festival in austin, texas. for more information about the festival visit texasbookfestival.org. >> brooke stoddard joined booktv at george mason university in virginia to talk about his book, "world in the balance." mr. stoddard was one of the authors appearing at the fall for the book festival, held annually at the university. this is just under half an hour. >> and you're watching booktv tv on c-span2. we are on location at george mason university. university. every fall for the book festival called fall for the book. one of the authors who was speakin
generation starting to use their hands more and work together in communities and share ideas a little more. digital tools -- he created a magazine for the movement. baker affairs which are hugely successful, 100,000 people come over the weekend, there was one in new york a couple weekends ago. the maker of movement was something they identified first, leading edge tech publishers, so not incidental that they spotted this was technologically driven ball so -- i hope tim o'reilly will forgive me the roots are in the 60s kind of social change, power of the people. they have their roots in the country and recognize justice steve jobs it a cultural revolution under this as well. it was a combination of digital technology and new tools allowing people to do extraordinary things and the recognition that people want to use their hands. we are all makers on something. if you r cook your maker. if you our gardener you are a maker. kids are born makers. there is the dignity in holding something made in your hand but we didn't have the skills to do this stuff. most of us didn't have the skills and wha
it's a good idea. why it's important as we go out to the major funders, it will be helpful for us to be able to show and hear a lot of people have already donated and shown their interest and how important this is to the donation. so i would encourage all of your viewers to do that no matter how modest. $50, $25, the numbers are more important at this point. >> and two -- of your favorite american authors from your past or current? >> i have children and grandchildren, that's like schedule me who is my favorite child or grandchildren. there are so many. it we are blessed that there are so many. i certainly have grown up as a student reading hemmingway and stenbeck. i have gravitated toward the poet. i love the great poet who can't? , i mean, i have -- sitting on my night stand, which i turn to every night and every morning. so there's so many. i hate to think about one or two. >> malcom 0 hagueen is the founder and chairman of the foundation of the american writers museum inspect is booktv on c-span2. >>> booktv will be live at the miami book fair international held on the miami d
. permanent military professor at the u.s. naval academy. what does that title mean. >> guest: well, we represent the permanent military professors, a hybrid, a joining of the professor officer corps and professor and the professional educators here at the naval academy. i spent the first half of a naval career flying aircraft for the u.s. navy, and about ten years ago made the transition to academia, where the navy provided an outstanding opportunity to go back to graduate school and get a specialty in a geographic part of the world where i specialize in middle eastern history. >> host: and now an author. "the politics and security of the gulf" is the numb of your book. that's kind of a big topic. >> guest: it is. it's part of the world where the united states has been involved in three hot wars in the past generation, the iran-iraq war, desert shield, desert storm, and operation iraqi freedom. it's a big topic, and it needs to be discussed, and investigated, which is part of the reason why we took on this topic. >> host: in your book, where do you begin talking about u.s. involvement
the founders were envisioning it was what people were used to for much of the history of the country that forces us to really look at what we mean by democracy and how we can get back. with slow democracy does is it offers a worldly thinking and a set of principles so that people can find their own policies that work for themselves and their own communities. we have town hall meetings and they worked incredibly well but in california that is in the tradition and there are others people can build on but if they can look and say okay in order to be really a valuable democratic process something needs to be inclusive and the lubber to it and it needs to be empowered. that provides enough of a framework for people to say here's how we can do it in our area. we don't have to have town halls we can have oranges and others in california so people can take that inspiration and use it wherever they are and hopefully i think in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversations. >>> rosemary gibson reports on the creation of the patient protection and affordable care act and its r
for joining us at the heritage foundation. we welcome those who joined us on our heritage.org web site on these occasions. we ask everyone in the house if he would be so kind as to check cellphones one last time and see that they are turned off. amazing how many speakers start doing that. we will post a program on our web site within 24 hours for your future reference and of course our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, dr. juan williams is a native of arizona, a master's degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from the university of california santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a variety of things. as a rock drummer he was part of several groups one of which opened for steppenwolf among other performers for those old enough to remember that. his first film, rocking the wall about rock music had spared in bringing down communism started airing on pbs this weekend will continue throughout th
tweet us your feedback, twitter.com/booktv. for the next 45 minutes, larry schweikart presents a history of america's global participation and influence from 1898 to 1945. the author posits that during this time the united states introduced numerous political, cultural and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our louis lehrman auditorium. we welcome those who join us on our web site on all these occasions. if you'll be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they're turned off. thank you, larry. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that when i say that. we will post the program on our web site within 24 hours for our future reference and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, dr. larry schweikart, is a native of arizona. he earned his bachelor and master's degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from the university of california santa
you. >> you're watching booktv. up next martha us nos balm talks about anti-muslim bigotry in the west. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> well, thank you very much, mark, for that great introduction. and i want to thank the seminary coo open for making it possible and also especially thank you for being here. i'm overwhelmed to see so many people. because my main hope is to engage with you and spend at least a half hour on q & a, i'm going speak briefly and what i'm going to do is introduce the book in a general way and focus on just one section about the bands in europe. once, not very long ago, americans and europeans prided themselves on their enlightened attitudes of religious toleration and understanding. although everyone knew that the history of the west was characterized by intense religious animosity and violence including such bloody episodes as the crusades and the wars of religion. but including as well, the quiter violence of colonial rebelling use domination by europeans in many parts of the world and added antiseminism and -- the gnat disifm which implicated grerm
at the manhattan institute. thank you for joining us. the question of whether and how governments, particularly the federal government direct tax dollars to industries was a discussion last night presidential debate and is becoming an ongoing theme in the campaign. the term on which the finance and industries have also been the focus of intense debate, but probably the most contentious example of all is the one on which diana furchtgott-roth of the manhattan to senior fellow and speaker this afternoon focuses and are tightly regulating to disaster, have green jobs policies are damaging america's economy. in fact, she subjects the assumptions and policies which led to such elevated as of now bankrupt seller paid no manufacture as well as the electric car battery manufacturer to a withering analysis, which we at the institute have come to expect from this oxford trained economist who served as chief of staff of the council of economic advisers -- sorry. during the administration of president george w. bush. while the serving direct investments in private firms and cautionary tales for those who t
of us in the library world are. so i'm looking forward to hearing your comments. and what i'd like to do now is introduce the moderator. [applause] >> it's my pleasure to be here, and i'd like to start by thanking debbie and her team for putting on such a great event. it's been wonderful to spend the day here. it's very exciting for me to be on this particular panel because it cuts to the heart of what this event is all about, reading and what the future of reading is. and i'm excited to have with me some of the most thoughtful people on this matter that i've seen, and i'll introduce them now. nicholas negroponte, the founder of one >> and robert darnton is the direct every of the harvard university libraries and a professor at harvard university. [applause] so we're going the start out by having each of the panelists give a four minute presentation on what they see as the future of reading, and we'll go into a discussion from there. and we'll start with nicholas. >> okay, thank you. i modestly suggested i go first because i wanted to talk about the basics, not particularly advocate one
useful ally to president kennedy. >> tide ted widmer, on the secret recordings of john f. kennedy. tonight. >> booktv sat down with wayne hsieh. it's just under 20 minutes. >> u.s. naval academy, west pointers and the civil war, is your book. what do you mean by the old army? >> guest: the old army is a term commonly used by historians. actually it's a time from the time period referring to the regular army. there's a joke that the old army is the army before every war. so there's a bunch of old army. so my book actually starts with the professionalization of the army and it's about how that process occurs and plays out in the civil war. >> host: give us a snapshot of what the old army, prior the war of 1812, was like. >> guest: before the war of 1812, and this is drawing on really historical literature by historians -- the army before the war of 1812 is a nonprofessional. it over corps obtained their positions through political influence, and as a consequence they're not -- because they're not professionals who went through a body of education and were promoted by some system of
sense and i continue to live my life by these principles. >> are these principles that you had and used when you were governor of new mexico? >> always, always and i actually delivered one of my state of the state addresses using the seven principles. look, here's how we need to conduct ourselves and anyway, just very commonsensical. >> so, if you would, your philosophy would and libertarian philosophy on the right side of government? >> well, libertarian philosophy if you were just too with a broadbrush stroke, the notion that most of us in this country are socially accepting and that we are fiscally responsible. that is a broadbrush stroke. a broad brushstrokes is wearing a pin, a lapel pin that says i am pro-choice regarding everything. well, pro-choice regarding everything means that actually, if your choices involve putting other people in harm's way or your choices and up defrauding or harming another human being, then that is when the government, that is where the government does have a role, to protect us against individuals, groups and corp rations that would do us harm. >> as
realize is that there's something very exciting going on in what you used to be hard to do stuff. .. >> recognize a a regular guy can compete with aerospace industry using the open source hardware, software, readily acceptable technology. i felt that show is what i saw the first web browser. when i realized the concept of publishing and putting things on the internet weren't -- was no easy we realize the moment something broadcast and publishing it was a matter of point* and click. that moment is when it just happened to. then we got the 3-d printer. you may be familiar with them but what takes pixels line york screened that is how it is looked at. and you hold it in your hand and then has more layers. that builds up things out of plastic. we got one by a children grow up with the 3-d printer they think anything they can draw upon the screen and that we don't have enough color or. [laughter] but not all children but they shot come. that is also of democratization moment. once you have seen and recognized the technology used to be expensive this cheap and easy introducing words li
thurmond's racial politics. see how they intersect with one another. i think that doing so gives us a history of what strom thurmond's america looks like. it helps us to see what was going on in the south and what was going on in the national, conservative political realm as well. he helped us rethink the history of modern conservative. a history, a history that thurmond is often left out. >> you can watch this and other programs online by booktv.org. >> david cherry has resigned on friday after an fbi investigation into e-mail security that has uncovered evidence of an extramarital affair between here and his biographer, paula broadwell. next, we air a book edited by paula broadwell. it reflects his military career and the wars in iraq and afghanistan. for about an hour at politics & prose in washington dc. >> evening, i am bradley graham, co-owner of politics & prose with my wife melissa. on behalf of the entire staff, i would like to welcome me you here. before turning to our guest author, i would just like to say a word about an important event coming up this april. it is being
's panel which i was granted be a part in his tone was they are coming to get us and the only way that i could prepare you for when they come is when you come to light so be here and it was this kind of paranoid thing that i hadn't heard before. was 45 minutes long and i would never get away with that in new hampshire. [laughter] the first time god had a mention most 20,000 in and 40,000 minutes jesus got a mention and then it ended. i forgot to tell you right after the music come he comes out and says now it's time to take up the offering out of the gate and everyone cheered. i could use that in new hampshire. [laughter] there was a very weak kind of prayer and then a was over. i've never been at what was a church service where there was such a little god, jesus, religion and was all political and was all paranoid. they're coming to get us and we have to get ready. i'm not sure that i observed the insight that it gave me but it sure made me understand more about the fear that is out there and often behind the vitriol that we experience and i often, you know when someone comes at me eith
insurance. so we have bipartisan support for two of the most important things that are going to level us. the things we don't do is think about where do we help the most people the fastest, thinking about per capita returns on investment and our biggest weakness as a nation is community colleges, it skill gaps that we have left open. left wide open between the industries we are holding on to as we compete globally and how well we have done educating the people to take their place in the economy and i would hope whatever agenda comes forward we have an agenda that is deeply focused on adult learning, adult education, community college and finding more ways for people to constructively entered the economy. >> i would concur with many of those points. i am grateful i live in a state that has the governor in deval patrick, living in a country with president barack obama. i am vigorously supporting him. creating a better access to educational opportunities and health care which is eliminating other disparities. the thing that is important we not obsess about, 99% or 47% and remember there are
house, aside from asking him to use his holy pulpit -- >> guest: i am somewhat serious. and this is a somewhat different dimension but we talk about this in the book. i would ask him to make the content for us. i think what is happening right now is the public discourse is so disjointed by these 30-second sound . -- sound bites. right now adult learning happens on the 24-hour news. so no one really understands the issues and it becomes emotionally charged and this is this is a chance for obama to really explain why he makes the decisions he does and maybe the opposition, to diagram it out and have a quiz afterwards to make sure. fill in that gap in learning the frankly people -- the one of the most popular videos are about the health care plan. these are caps in people's learning. >> host: it's a pleasure reading this book and it was nice meeting you. thanks for joining us. >> guest: oh, it was a pleasure. .. >> this is app hour and 15 minutes. >> i've just been told by c-span, i'm addressing the most serious audience i've ever addressed all of these years. [laughter]
me who fought and gave us that right. and i think we're losing sight of that right now. i've never been as afraid for our country as i am right now. i'm very every four country right now, but we've got to hold onto the greatness that we had. let me give you a little background. you have to know when you're winning. while that sounds like that's self-evident, it's not. when i was in seal team six, i really thought i was winning. you know, i was iced the low drag we call it. chicks docket. you remember of an elite counterterror you know, working with the best people, and i thought i was when because i was a member of this elite team. will, from a counterterrorism standpoint i was. but for their personal standpoint i wasn't. i was a terrible husband, terrible father. i couldn't serve two masters are by no later to psychology and wasn't able to like divide that it. said something that each at an early age. i wasn't able to do that. i do like serve one master and, of course, my master was the seal thing. so you to find out, you determine for himself what is winning. and if you think you
. for more information visit texasbookfestival.org. >> tell us when you think of your programming this weekend. comment on our facebook call or send us an e-mail. nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> next, chrystia freeland talked about a rise of the superrich, the.-- the top 0.one% of the population and the impact they have in the world. this is hosted by politics and prose bookstore in washington d.c. and it is about an hour. [applause] >> thanks a lot. sorry to keep everyone waiting. i will say a few things about what is in the book. as i have been doing some interviews with my book, a favored way of interviewers in the conversation is to save the rich have always been with us after all. actually, that is not true. one of the points, the starting point of my book is to say actually things are different now. we really need to be aware of this new political and economic reality that incoming quality has grown hugely in the united states and the industrialized world and around the world and a lot of the action is at the very top -- is that better? i am so short i have to
or constitutional and republican or liberal and republican. you can use any of the terms. alexander hamilton used the term "representative democracy," we're based on majority rule and consent, but that is limited by a constitution; hence, this compound regime. now, one of the major charges that the colonist raised was he, george the iii, combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowledged by our laws giving assent to take acts of pretended legislation. now, of course, the constitution he was referring to in 1776 was the british constitution. the and sent constitution, but that con cement is the same. there was foreign jurisdiction that was going to have authority over us. we're going to examine now the ideas and practices of those who, in our time, have combined with others to subject us or attempt to to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution. well, ideas have consequences as we learned long ago from an early isi scholar, richard weaver. let's examine the ideas. the global governance project. these are not hard to find. you don't have to be invi
the electrical wiring in along with a plastic and now i can use other substances like starch-based substances which is biodegradable. i had the privilege of talking to a biologist in new york and he is developing a dna printer. yeah, so we know how to sequence things pretty easily. the sequences are not hard. i can find them on ebay now. but printing out, to print the dna, it is a big tool. but every year we get our flu shots, right? we definitely will soon. we can guess what the flu is going to be this year. we never know. rather than at the beginning of the season the doctor says, actually, it turns out that influenza is the this or that end, here's a little code and print out your own vaccine. and, you know, you little liquid and drink it and that is a 3-d printer as well. that is printing dna, which is a physical material. you have to ask things like what could go wrong and questions to that effect. i think the only thing that stands in our way, i have seen a lot of elitist types of technology and i'm very impressed. i agree that you're not going to print them out anytime soon. but you ca
of history at the u.s. table academy. author of several books, including his most recent, american sheikhs, to families,j) for generations, and the storyk) of americj)a's influence in then middle east. who was dana? >> the founder of what later became the american university of beirut. >> added he go about doing that? >> a lot of american entrepreneur real spirit. >> made the family quite wealthy. >> what was his goal in founding the american university? >> his initial goal differ from a became his life's work. he arrived in the middle east and 1850's determined to convert muslims to christianity and very quickly realized that wasn't going to happen and that's the way to make a connection was not to convert them, but to educate them and to improve their lives and tangible, concrete ways because that is with they responded to positively. once he had that in sight he ran with it and develop what they became the harvard of the middle east. >> is is still open? >> it is time indeed. weathered many tough years. it remains open and stay that way even through the tough times of the civil war. >>
on the emotional language used to describe them than on rational appraisal of what had occurred. whereas europeans continue to declare that their love of country grew out of a childlike devotion to father kings and where is american and french sons of liberty had five revolutions against monarchs from what they called motives of brotherly love. americans in 1812 emphasize that from their patriotism grew another brady of familiar protection, the romantic love between courting couples. consider for example the songsters who raise their voices and chorus in corristan a ballots called the love of country. it appeared in a publication called the national songbook in 1813. the lyrics explained, a soldier, his honors his life and he that won't stand to his post will never stand by his wife. since love and honor are the same, or are so near a light that neither can exist alone but forage side-by-side. then farewell sweethearts bear pretty girls to do and we drove the -- we will kick it out in. said there you have the title of my talk, love and honor. with that promise at lebanon are the same. men and wome
around us. and if you think about how you make those decisions, one of the things that we do in the navy seal team is we have an analogy about how you make tough choices in your life on the front line. and we talk about how you use a compass. what we know is that if you take a compass and you point it in a particular direction, that you can walk all day, and and you might walk over mountains, you can walk through a forest, you can walk through a desert, and what happens is at the end of the day you end up in one very particular place. we also know that if at the beginning of that journey you make a decision that you're going to make a change of course, and you might make a change of course of just one or two degrees in your life, but you decide you're going to make a change of course of one or two degrees, and then you start to walk that new path, and you can walk it over mountains, through a forest, through a diss earth, what happens is -- desert, what happens is at the end of the day you end up in a completely different place. and we know for those who are going to read "the warrior's
rosen and meghna chakrabarti for joining us. >> tell us what you think about programming this weekend. you can tweet us at booktv. comment on our facebook wall, or send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. from the fourth annual book festival, the triumph of the city featuring edward glaeser. his book is "the triumph of the city: how our greatest invention makes us richer, smarter, greener, healthier and happier." >> thank you for coming to the auditorium today. this is brought to you by wbur new station. thank you. thank you. i am sure some of you are saying, wow, that is bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller. i thought he was thinner. i thought he had more hair. [laughter] you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and think the book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific event? [applause] >> that is also part of the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this session and without their generosity, it would be hard to put on an even
their common want to buy it from us. we appreciate that. it is that attitude that keeps us in business. if we didn't have that, we would not still be here. >> this one has always been very involved in the community. from small things, we service a ticket agent. everything from chamber orchestra comments, we sell tickets for. we have become a supporter of the arts in that way. which also brings a lot of people in. we are also on local boards and involved with the local downtown organization. and are involved with local schools and supporting activities there. some of it is monitoring and some is helping out. >> we are definitely reliant upon our community of readers and writers and the people who support independent stories we have the vermont college of fine arts right up the street that has writing programs for both adults and children. persuasive customers go when they come in as our best-seller table. that is the independent booksellers. the best-seller list. it is a survey of independence across the country. it is one of independent booksellers are selling more stuff. people go straight t
started. this is live coverage running just a few minutes late. again, a reminder you can follow us on facebook and facebook.com/booktv and we have exclusive updates and author interviews, et cetera on her facebook page. just waiting for mr. patterson. this should be to shortly ensure that coverage of the miami book fair international 29th year. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon. please take your seats. we are about to begin the session. thank you so much. i am marilou harrison and many of you have heard from me because he been in this room yesterday and today. i served as a volunteer here, a very proud: tiered of miami book fair international candidate to recognize is that done before, all of the volunteers come to thousands of volunteers for miami dade college as well as the community who come together reach you to think this book fair take place. i'd also like to recognize those who are fri
was the president's chief domestic adviser. it was my recommendation that created the u.s. holocaust memorial museum, the commission that led to that. i worked on behalf of the soviet jewry, but during the clinton administration i was ambassador to the european union and as undersecretary, of the holocaust negotiations. uninitiated $8 billion of compensation from the swiss, germans, austrians, slave labor, forced labor, parts, insurance i'm trying to look at this from the perspective of someone who has been a senior government official but also a leader in the jewish community. that is why this book has been endorsed by both president clinton and. [indiscernible] >> how global forces are impacting the jewish people and its relationship with the united states. this is book tv on c-span2. >> a criticism of his onetime liberal ideologies and opines on several current political and social issues next on book tv. delivers the 2012 manhattan institute lecture at the plaza would sell in new york city. it is a little over an hour. >> the indictment of the west. and i thought. we were shooting in white chape
on a takedown of the treasury in the auto bailout. three guys earned $4.2 billion from the u.s. treasury. you remember that from the debate, right? no one asks, no one is answering that begin today, we got the confirmation from the romney campaign. now, what is this all about? and what does it have to do with the congo? i was reporting for bbc television and the guardian. when i found out that someone had figured out how to dip their hands, their claws into the foreign aid fund, the debt relief given to the republic of congo which is suffering a cholera epidemic. this money was intended to be used, $90 million intended to be used to in the cholera epidemic in the congo and yet it was waylaid by a bird of prey, a vulture, a vulture fund, a guide -- managed by a guy named paul singer. is other middle name is elliott. paul elliott singer who has accompanied by a good name of elliott management so i went up the congo river for abc television to find out what happened and i found elliott management had their claws around the cholera of money for the congo. we reported it on bbc television and the
be in the situation we were in, we felt safe and comfortable there and i feel like my father wanted us to have an education, he knew that education was the key to a better life but i really think he thought all of us would come back home and try to work from there. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> gene robinson of the episcopal diocese of new hampshire's and first openly gay person elected to be episcopate presents his arguments for gay marriage. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> thank you. i think of cambridge as a very sophisticated place but surely you have better things to do on a friday night, really. i am delighted that i was your choice tonight. i am really very honored and it is a special privilege to be introduced by patrick. he is one of my favorite people in the whole world and he is doing some great things and if you haven't bought his book, by it now. is fantastic. welcome. we have pds people here? yes. any harvard people here? yes, oh yes, okay. i am really pleased to be doing this book right now. i have to admit i didn't have time to write
of your afternoon with us here. behal myseuld like to welcome you all on behalf of david lesch and myself. this is a wonderful session.our. we're so happy they your here.ss i wanted to introduce david lesch to you. he is a professor of middle east history at trinity university iy san antonio.nker a prolific writer and thinker ot the middle east and what is t' happening in the region.e it's a treat to have him here today. he has written his new bookyriat "syria: the fall of the house of assad", which i'm hoping you you sign all purchase debt and assigned. again and sign my copy first. he has met extensively witheadi president assad and leading bete syrian officials.n the he has been in the middle east,, studying the middle east, makin, connections and reason that's he important is, of course, hee'son knows of what speaks. to write n without understanding the players, and lucky for us professor lesch knows quite a bit about what is happening in syria and can answer some of the very important issues taking place today. in fact, this past month has been a lot of can aviate there he is going t
are spoiled was in attendance at the book festival held at the annually. >> joining us at george mason gears professor philip auerswald, his most recent book is this, shrink three. here's the cover of the book. what role does fear play in development? >> well, that's a great question. they don't talk about what role does fear play in our conversation about development, so when we talk about our reality to share our ideas in the marketplace can we compete with other atheists only know three things about marketplace ideas. short-term sells better than long-term. fear sells better than hope that negative sells better than positive and exaggerated sells better than moderated. so we see a disproportionate number of short-term narratives of negative exaggerated stories essentially. so short-term, negative can exaggerated. there's good reasons for that we are creatures that grouping savanna or environments where were the only subject to threats. so we are looking at the that's going to hurt us. but we are no longer as environments. we are in a complex economy that really relies on organizations to
>>> joining us here on the sety. is another author we want to introduce you to. this is bryan latell. co herself -- here's his book.roun. if you will start gi giving us r your background.ounciln particularly your cia background. >> i worked at cia and nationalp intelligence counsel inac washington for about thirty fivl years.in >> what capacity? >> i became the national intelligence officer for latinee america which it a three or foua star military equivalent.on he was a civilian. it was a substantial position. i had responsibility for all of latin america and cuba. on the an lettic side oft -- intelligence. >> what does thatno mean? >> i was not a field operative. i did not go and conductof espionage. i did not go out and be foreignl agency. most of my career at headquarter mainly virginia. i wrote national intelligencean estimates. quite a few on cuba over the >> b years, and on many of the other ca latin american countries. how >> before we get to castro and the castro regime. at how did you get interested in the work? >> i was student at georgetownes university where i later taughte
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